• "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?
  • "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

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  1. #11
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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    well all in all .. you can just buy it and have it uncensored
    "The mighty oak tree was once a tiny nut that stood its ground" - XD

  2. #12
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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    Quote Originally Posted by madmanmark08
    well all in all .. you can just buy it and have it uncensored
    Well...yeah. But that's technically not the point of this thread. It would've been nice if we had access to the uncensored version in order to get the "true meaning" behind Outlaw Star, but I know I probably wouldn't have understood all the adult-based humor and content as a kid in the same way as I do now. This could be different for other people, though.
    A boy has the right to dream. There are endless possibilities stretched out before him. What awaits him down the path he will then have to choose; the boy doesn't always know. At some point the boy then becomes an adult, and learns what he was able to become. Joy and sadness will forever accompany this. He is confronted with a choice; when this happens, does he bid his past farewell in his heart? Once a boy becomes an adult, he can no longer go back to being a boy; the boy is now a man. Only one thing can be said: "A boy has the right to dream.". For those endless possibilities are stretched out before him.

    We must remember...all men were once boys.

  3. #13
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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    I didn't like the censorship as it took out some important relevant parts, but small things censored like the words or giving Melfina clothes etc isn't much of a bother.

    I remeber 08th MS team on Toonami everytime I saw it in the first episode where he opened that door on the abandoned ship and nothing came out except some trash I was like "why is he so distraught/surprised". Finally years later I saw it and there's a body coming out and I was like oooo.... That makes sense! ;p

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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    Quote Originally Posted by dao2
    I didn't like the censorship as it took out some important relevant parts, but small things censored like the words or giving Melfina clothes etc isn't much of a bother.

    I remeber 08th MS team on Toonami everytime I saw it in the first episode where he opened that door on the abandoned ship and nothing came out except some trash I was like "why is he so distraught/surprised". Finally years later I saw it and there's a body coming out and I was like oooo.... That makes sense! ;p
    Oh man, 08th MS Team was probably my favorite Gundam story based on the fact that it was arguably the most realistic. Kind of a Romeo-and-Juliet love story, but the universe was appealing.

    But yeah, censorship throughout that one as well.
    A boy has the right to dream. There are endless possibilities stretched out before him. What awaits him down the path he will then have to choose; the boy doesn't always know. At some point the boy then becomes an adult, and learns what he was able to become. Joy and sadness will forever accompany this. He is confronted with a choice; when this happens, does he bid his past farewell in his heart? Once a boy becomes an adult, he can no longer go back to being a boy; the boy is now a man. Only one thing can be said: "A boy has the right to dream.". For those endless possibilities are stretched out before him.

    We must remember...all men were once boys.

  5. #15
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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    Censorship and this anime are 2 things that should never meet. To answer your question, I was more so disappointed with how it was censored. From what I can tell, anime takes a lot of work to be drawn, voiced, and animated, and it seems like such a waste to have someone go through all of that just so that it can be edited out as a means so that you could view it. Episode 25 was a prime example of this.


  6. #16
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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    Personally I don't feel this topic has much merit. Don't get me wrong, it's a good topic to discuss about the censorship and how you felt about it. But the idea of "nostalgia" over something uncensored is something I can't grasp.

    I guess to put it this way, and this is my opinion:

    "If you watched Outlaw Star when it was on Toonami and censored, it will be nostalgic to watch; however, if you want to see the show for what it was supposed to be seen as, the uncensored version is definitely better in that argument."

    The only time that the censored version would bring disappointment over the uncensored version is if you never watched it back when it was on Toonami. Then I can understand that because there is no nostalgia to it. You following me? I wish I could get the censored version just like Mantis wants because it would be cool to watch it the way I used to as a kid when it was first on TV. But most who have never seen it on TV wouldn't find the censored version necessary. It would just be interesting to see the edited version again through it's entirety. It wouldn't disappoint, it would make me feel like I was 10-11 years old again watching it for the first time.
    "We All Make Choices. But In The End, Our Choices Make Us."
    -Andrew Ryan

  7. #17
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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Starwind
    Personally I don't feel this topic has much merit. Don't get me wrong, it's a good topic to discuss about the censorship and how you felt about it. But the idea of "nostalgia" over something uncensored is something I can't grasp.

    I guess to put it this way, and this is my opinion:

    "If you watched Outlaw Star when it was on Toonami and censored, it will be nostalgic to watch; however, if you want to see the show for what it was supposed to be seen as, the uncensored version is definitely better in that argument."

    The only time that the censored version would bring disappointment over the uncensored version is if you never watched it back when it was on Toonami. Then I can understand that because there is no nostalgia to it. You following me? I wish I could get the censored version just like Mantis wants because it would be cool to watch it the way I used to as a kid when it was first on TV. But most who have never seen it on TV wouldn't find the censored version necessary. It would just be interesting to see the edited version again through it's entirety. It wouldn't disappoint, it would make me feel like I was 10-11 years old again watching it for the first time.
    I respect your opinion Gene, but I believe this topic has more merit than you think . If shows like Outlaw Star in which the original was intended for more of a mature audience, then we as kids probably wouldn't have known about them as early as we did. Even though I disagree with most censorship issues since I'm older and know better, it's the reason why shows did this that got me into anime at such a young age. Then, as we watch the uncut version in late adolescence, we can experience the show with both the nostalgia from watching it as a kid and with the appreciation and the "this show was better than I remember" feeling from watching it as a teenager/adult.

    I understand the fact that people still enjoy watching the uncensored version only (they better...), and that the order of watching the censored and the uncensored does NOT work both ways, but the fact that the censored and uncensored versions concurrently exist is why I, in particular, truly enjoy Outlaw Star now with the same fervor as I did ten years ago. That goes without saying, though...
    A boy has the right to dream. There are endless possibilities stretched out before him. What awaits him down the path he will then have to choose; the boy doesn't always know. At some point the boy then becomes an adult, and learns what he was able to become. Joy and sadness will forever accompany this. He is confronted with a choice; when this happens, does he bid his past farewell in his heart? Once a boy becomes an adult, he can no longer go back to being a boy; the boy is now a man. Only one thing can be said: "A boy has the right to dream.". For those endless possibilities are stretched out before him.

    We must remember...all men were once boys.

  8. #18
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    RE: "The Censored Version": Did it add nostagic value or disappointment?

    Then, as we watch the uncut version in late adolescence, we can experience the show with both the nostalgia from watching it as a kid and with the appreciation and the "this show was better than I remember" feeling from watching it as a teenager/adult.
    I agree that watching the uncensored version even now brings me back to being a kid, but it reminds me of the time where I watched Outlaw Star when I first got it on DVD and not on Toonami. Whenever I see clips of Outlaw Star with the Cartoon Network or Toonami watermark on it and the edit of scenes like Melfina having clothes when in the suitcase, that reminds me of the first time I watched it, not when it is uncensored.

    Yes the show is better with no censorship but what I meant with the idea of no merit for this topic is that Censorship doesn't become a battle of "nostalgia" versus "disappointment". If the title of this topic was "The Censored Version: Is it disappointing to watch it now over the uncensored" then I can understand it. Because Nostalgia isn't a formidable side of an argument. Nostalgia is defined as, "a wistful desire to return in thought or in fact to a former time in one's life, to one's home or homeland, or to one's family and friends; a sentimental yearning for the happiness of a former place or time". It's a personal feeling or thought that isn't really an opinionated one, it's a self reflection or a memory that is sparked from something.

    I am not trying to make a fight out of this, by no means. I was just merely questioning the debate on this topic.

    But I guess in the end if you are asking if I watched the edited version now, would I be disappointed? Definitely not, it's what originally brought me into the show and the Anime and it reminds me of being a kid when I used to rush home so I could make it on time to watch Outlaw Star right when it started. So no, the censorship can't and won't disappoint me if I watched it even now.
    "We All Make Choices. But In The End, Our Choices Make Us."
    -Andrew Ryan

  9. #19
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    I know that it never would have saw the light of day on 90's American TV if it was uncensored. Probably not even today either with the amount of nudity in it. So I'm glad they did censor Outlaw Star for kids being able to view it in American at least. But is the uncensored version better? Heck yes. :p I thought it was funny when I saw it uncut for the first time, I finally could tell Jim had Gene's blood on his hand from episode 8 I believe. In the edited version, he was just staring at his blank hand and freaking out. I was like, "Huh? What is he looking at?".

    I remember when Adult Swim was first running, they had the uncut version of Yu Yu Hakusho on, but I think a lot of kids were invested in it, so they edited it for Toonami instead. Then they brought it back uncut on Adult Swim again. :p When Outlaw Star was finally advertised on Adult Swim as uncut, I was like, "Oh boy, is this going to have the nudity in it?", but they still censored that. :p

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